Biotechnological Production of Plant Secondary Metabolites


by

Ilkay E. Orhan

DOI: 10.2174/97816080511441120101
eISBN: 978-1-60805-114-4, 2012
ISBN: 978-1-60805-410-7

  
  


Indexed in: Scopus

Modern techniques have been developed to overcome problems associated with the extraction of natural products from plants. These techn...[view complete introduction]
PDF US $
- Single user / Non-Library usage: 49
- Multi user / Library usage: 196
Print-On-Demand (P.O.D): *125
Special Offer for Single user / Non-Library usage (PDF + P.O.D): *149

*(Excluding Mailing and Handling)
Purchase: Book Chapters
Download Flyers

Table of Contents

Foreword , Pp. i-ii (2)

Bilge Sener

Download Free

Preface , Pp. iii

Ilkay Erdogan Orhan

Download Free

List of Contributors , Pp. iv-vi (3)

Ilkay Erdogan Orhan

Download Free

Plant Cell and Tissue Culture as a Source of Secondary Metabolites , Pp. 3-20 (18)

Rodríguez-Sahagún A., Del Toro-Sánchez C.L., Gutierrez-Lomelí M. and Castellanos-Hernández O.A.

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Natural Products Extracts: Terpenes and Phenolics , Pp. 21-35 (15)

Gutiérrez-Lomelí M., Del Toro-Sánchez C.L., Rodríguez-Sahagún A. and Castellanos-Hernández O.A.

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Biotechnological Production of Coumarins , Pp. 36-52 (17)

Alev Tosun

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Novel Biomedical Agents from Plants , Pp. 53-66 (14)

Athar Ata

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Production of Anthocyanins by Plant Cell and Tissue Culture Strategies , Pp. 67-86 (20)

Claudia Simões, Norma Albarello, Tatiana C. de Castro and Elisabeth Mansur

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

In Vitro Organ Cultures of the Cancer Herb Castilleja tenuiflora Benth. as Potential Sources of Iridoids and Antioxidant Compounds , Pp. 87-106 (20)

Gabriela T.-Tapia, Gabriel R.-Romero, Alma R. L.-Laredo, Kalina B.-Torres and Alejandro Zamilpa

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Plant Cell Tissue and Organ Cultures in Terpenoids , Pp. 107-123 (17)

Irem Tatli

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Bioactive Chemical Constituents and Biotechnological Production of Secondary Metabolites in Amaranthaceae Plants, Gomphreneae Tribe , Pp. 124-158 (35)

Marcos J. Salvador, Nathalia L. Andreazza, Aislan C.R.F. Pascoal, Paulo S. Pereira, Suzelei C. França, Orghêda L.A.D. Zucchi and Diones A. Dias

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Biotechnology Approaches and Economic Analysis of Jojoba Natural Products , Pp. 159-175 (17)

Mohammed A.M. Aly and Aydin Basarir

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

The Effects of Pesticides on Plant Secondary Metabolites , Pp. 176-186 (11)

Monica Hancianu and Ana C. Aprotosoaie

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Cardenolide Production as an Important Drug Agent , Pp. 187-199 (13)

Sebnem Harput U.

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Progress in Biotechnological Applications of Diverse Species in Boraginaceae Juss. , Pp. 200-214 (15)

Ufuk Koca, Hatice Çölgeçen and Nueraniye Reheman

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Production of Anticancer Secondary Metabolites: Impacts of Bioprocess Engineering , Pp. 215-240 (26)

Sajjad Khani, Jaleh Barar, Ali Movafeghi and Yadollah Omidi

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Subject Index , Pp. 241-243 (3)

Ilkay Erdogan Orhan

Download Free

Plant Index , Pp. 244-252 (9)

Ilkay Erdogan Orhan

Download Free

Foreword

Modern life is complex and evolution went along way starting from very simple organic molecules to larger biomolecules and, in addition, they interact with other classes of molecules in the environment. It is the essence of scientific research to be in constant evolution. Plant cell science, plant genetics, and plant biotechnology of today bear only faint resemblance to what they used to be only twenty years ago. Plant cell reports keep pace with this evolution.

Plants have evolved an amazing array of metabolic pathways leading to molecules capable of responding promptly and effectively to stress situations imposed by biotic and abiotic factors, some of which supply the ever-growing needs of humankind for natural chemicals, such as pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, agrochemicals, food and chemical additives, biofuels, and biomass. Robotics and combinatorial techniques allow chemists to synthesize single libraries that contain more compounds than ever before. Especially, medicinal chemists but also chemists active in the catalysis area have embraced this efficient new synthesis tool. Moreover, advances in molecular biology and genomics continue to improve our understanding of biological processes and to suggest new approaches to deal with inadequately or untreated diseases that afflict mankind. Despite of all the progress in both molecular biology/genomics and combinatorial chemistry methods, it is generally recognized that the number of pharmaceutically relevant hits is not directly proportional to the number of compounds screened. Both structural diversity and complexity in a collection of molecules are essential to address.

13 Chapters in this eBook on medicinal plant biotechnology covers recent developments in this field. It includes a comprehensive up-to-date survey on established medicinal plants and on molecules which gained importance in recent years. The chapters published in this eBook today address highly relevant issues in modern plant cell science and plant molecular biology.

In “biotechnological production of plant secondary metabolites”, expert researchers provide detailed practical information on some of the most important methods employed in the engineering of plant secondary metabolism pathways and in the acquisition of essential knowledge in performing this activity, including the significant advances and emerging strategies. The chapters include introductions to their respective topics, lists of the necessary materials and methods, findings along with discussions step-by-step.

Among secondary metabolites, the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds which have a potential use as an antioxidant and terpenes extensively used as flavors and fragrances in perfumery and medicines are described in detail. Recent advances in plant biotechnology have been explained by showing the potential of plant cell and tissue cultures for the large-scale production of valuable secondary metabolites. One of the most important secondary metabolite of the plants known as coumarins has been examined regarding to the biotechnological view.

Natural products with potential biomedical applications along with the production of bioactive compounds by using biotechnological methods have been described. The production of anthocyanins under in vitro conditions has been given in detail for researchers in plant biotechnology. From Scrophulariaceae family, Castilleja tenuiflora Benth. is one of the medicinal plants used in Mexican folk medicine in the treatment of cancer. Root and shoot cultures of this plant species have been investigated for the production of flavonoids and iridoids which are responsible for antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. Strategies to increase secondary metabolite production in plant cell cultures have been explained by giving examples for terpenoids.

Biotechnological investigations on Amaranthaceae plant species have been summarized. Biotechnology approaches have been shown for the utilization of Jojoba which is an economical important plant by giving propagation and cloning of genes coding for economically important traits. The production of cardenolides in Digitalis cultures was extensively described for the industrial production. Depending on their medicinal and economical importance, the production of secondary metabolites of the plant species from Boraginaceae family using biotechnological methods have been outlined. The impacts of cell and tissue culture technologies for the large-scale production of anticancer secondary metabolites have also been included.

Ilkay Erdogan Orhan has produced a magnificent effort covering relevant aspects of the medicinal plants in this eBook. Botanists, chemists, biochemists, pharmacognosists and molecular biologists having any interest potentially bioactive compounds will be satisfied in the eBook content.

Ilkay Erdogan Orhan is an experienced young pharmacognosist for many years now, she has been a scientist at the Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy Gazi University, involving with Turkish medicinal plant and marine organisms screening program. Her work includes the biological evaluation and phytochemical studies of secondary metabolites for drug discovery. She has published many scientific articles devoted to the discovery of new bioactive natural compounds and author/co-authored several chapters on the subject of medicinal plants. This wide experience has given her a broad perspective on drug discovery from biological sources and has benefited this eBook enormously. This eBook will be useful by academic and industrial scientists having any interest in the potential of plants as a source of bioactive lead compounds and to all who are interested in medicinal plants.

Prof. Dr. Bilge Sener
Professor of Pharmacognosy
Faculty of Pharmacy
Gazi University
Ankara-Turkey


Preface

Biotechnology can be considered to be originated from prehistoric times, when microorganisms were already used for processes like fermentation. In fact, the earliest use of biotechnology might have been started with lactic acid fermentation by Louis Pasteur in 1857. Then, discovery of penicillin from Penicillium sp. in 1929 by Alexander Fleming led to large scale production of this antibiotic during World War II using cultures of this microfungus, which refers to another early application of biotechnological methods. Later on, biotechnology has become a very important tool in every aspect of plant research and is now extensively applied to production of secondary metabolites from many plant species. The field of plant biotechnology has gained a lot of attraction from scientists due to its importance in pharmaceutical, agricultural, forestry, food, and some other sectors. Especially, plant cell and tissue culture techniques are important in vitro precise methods using various plant parts applicable in large-scale. Plant biotechnology is such an immense scope varying from traditional plant breeding to genetically-engineered plants, which is out of the borders of the current eBook. In this eBook, the chapters will cover biotechnological studies performed on different groups of plant secondary metabolites such as terpenes, phenolics, coumarins, anthocyanins, iridoids, and cardiac glycosides. Some of the chapters will also mention about biotransformation aspects on several bioactive compound classes.

In this regard, I would like to thank to Bentham Publishers for offering me the kind invitation to edit this valuable eBook. I would also like to extend my greatest thanks for the supports of the authors of the eBook, who contributed qualified chapters by giving their precious times into this project. I am sure that the eBook will provide an open platform to read and learn the latest knowledge on biotechnological production of plant secondary metabolites and will give new perspectives on the scope.

Prof. Dr. Ilkay Erdogan Orhan
Faculty of Pharmacy
Eastern Mediterranean University
Gazimagosa (Famagusta)
The Northern Cyprus

&

Faculty of Pharmacy
Gazi University
Ankara
Turkey

List of Contributors

Editor(s):
Ilkay E. Orhan
Eastern Mediterranean University, Gazimagosa (Famagusta), The Northern Cyprus & Gazi University
Ankara
Turkey




Contributor(s):
N. Albarello
Núcleo de Biotecnologia Vegetal
Universidade do Estado do
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil


M.A.M. Aly
Department of Arid Land Agriculture, and Department of Agribusiness, Faculty of Food and Agriculture
United Arab Emirates University
P.O. Box 17555
Al Ain
UAE


N.L. Andreazza
Curso de Farmácia, Departamento de Biologia Vegetal
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), C.P. 6109
Campinas
SP, 13083-970
Brazil


A.C. Aprotosoaie
Faculty of Pharmacy
Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Iasi
Romania


A. Ata
Department of Chemistry
The University of Winnipeg
515 Portage Avenue
Winnipeg
MB, R3B 2E
Canada


J. Barar
Research Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and School of Advanced Biomedical Sciences
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences
Tabriz
Iran


A. Basarir
Department of Arid land Agriculture, and Department of Agribusiness
Faculty of Food and Agriculture , United Arab Emirates University
Al Ain, P.O. Box 17555
UAE


K. Bermúdez-Torres
Departamento de Biotecnología
P. O. Box 24, 62730, Yautepec
Morelos
México


T. Carvalho de Castro
Núcleo de Biotecnologia Vegetal
Universidade do Estado do
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil


O.A. Castellanos-Hernández
Centro Universitario de la Ciénega
Universidad de Guadalajara
Av. Universidad 1115, Col. Lindavista, CP 47810, Ocotlán
Jalisco
México


H. Cölgecen
Department of Biology
Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Faculty of Arts and Science
Zonguldak
İncivez, 67100
Turkey


C.L. Del Toro-Sánchez
Centro Universitario de la Ciénega
Universidad de Guadalajara
Av. Universidad 1115, Col. Lindavista, CP 47810, Ocotlán
Jalisco
CP, 47810
México


D.A. Dias
Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto
Universidade de São Paulo (USP)
Via do Café, s/n
Ribeirão Preto
SP, 14040-903
Brazil


S.C. França
Unidade de Biotecnologia
Universidade de Ribeirão Preto (UNAERP)
Ribeirão Preto
SP, 14096-900
Brazil


M. Gutiérrez-Lomelí
Centro Universitario de la Ciéneg
Universidad de Guadalajara
Av. Universidad 1115, Col. Lindavista, Ocotlán
Jalisco
CP, 47810
México


M. Hancianu
Faculty of Pharmacy
Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Iasi
Romania


S. Harput
Department of Pharmacognosy
Hacettepe University, Faculty of Pharmacy
Ankara, 06100
Turkey


S. Khani
Research Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences
Tabriz
Iran


U. Koca
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy
Gazi University
Ankara, 06330
Turkey


A.R. López-Laredo
Departamento de Biotecnología
Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional
P. O. Box 24, Yautepec
Morelos, 62730
México


E. Mansur
Núcleo de Biotecnologia Vegetal
Universidade do Estado do
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil


A. Movafeghi
Research Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and Plant Biology Department
Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Tabriz
Tabriz
Iran


Y. Omidi
Research Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology and School of Advanced Biomedical Sciences
Tabriz University of Medical Sciences
Tabriz
Iran


A.C.R.F. Pascoal
Curso de Farmácia, Departamento de Biologia Vegetal
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), C.P. 6109
Campinas
SP, 13083-970
Brazil


P.S. Pereira
Unidade de Biotecnologia
Universidade de Ribeirão Preto (UNAERP)
Ribeirão Preto
SP, 14096-900
Brazil


N. Reheman
Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy
Gazi University
Ankara, 06330
Turkey


A. Rodríguez-Sahagún
Centro Universitario de la Ciénega
Universidad de Guadalajara
Av. Universidad 1115, Col. Lindavista, , Ocotlán
Jalisco
CP, 47810
México


G. Rosas-Romero
Departamento de Biotecnología
Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional
P. O. Box 24, , Yautepec
Morelos, 62730
México


M.J. Salvador
Curso de Farmácia, Departamento de Biologia Vegetal
Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), C.P. 6109
P. O. Box 24, Yautepec
Campinas
SP, 13083-970
Brazil


C. Simões
Núcleo de Biotecnologia Vegetal
Universidade do Estado do
Rio de Janeiro
Brazil


I.I. Tatli
Department of Pharmaceutical Botany
Faculty of Pharmacy, Hacettepe University
Ankara, 06100
Turkey


A. Tosun
Department of Pharmacognosy
Faculty of Pharmacy, Ankara University
Ankara, 06100
Turkey


G. Trejo-Tapia
Departamento de Biotecnología
Centro de Desarrollo de Productos Bióticos, Instituto Politécnico Nacional
P. O. Box 24, Yautepec
Morelos, 62730
México


A. Zamilpa
Centro de Investigación Biomédica del Sur
Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social
Argentina No. 1, Xochitepec
Morelos, 62790
México


O.L.A.D. Zucchi
Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas de Ribeirão Preto
Universidade de São Paulo (USP)
Via do Café, s/n
Ribeirão Preto
SP, 14040-903
Brazil




Advertisement


Webmaster Contact: urooj@benthamscience.org Copyright © 2014 Bentham Science