Cultural Competence In Assessment, Diagnosis, And Intervention With Ethnic Minorities: Some Perspectives from Psychology, Social Work, and Education


by

Robert G. Malgady

DOI: 10.2174/97816080513041110101
eISBN: 978-1-60805-130-4, 2011
ISBN: 978-1-60805-407-7



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Indexed in: Scopus

Without a thorough understanding of culture and its nuances on part of the mental health service providers, alienation, stigma, and cu...[view complete introduction]

Table of Contents

Foreword

- Pp. i

Reuben M. Castagno

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Preface

- Pp. ii

Robert G. Malgady

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List of Contributors In Order of Appearance

- Pp. iii-iv (2)

Robert G. Malgady

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Comprehensive Assessment for a Multicultural Society

- Pp. 3-23 (21)

Richard H. Dana

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Assessment Bias in Psychological Measurement of Ethnic Minorities

- Pp. 24-27 (4)

Robert G. Malgady

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TEMAS (Tell-Me-A-Story) Multicultural Assessment in the New Millennium

- Pp. 28-37 (10)

Giuseppe Costantino, Elsa B. Cardalda, Richard H. Dana, Jose V. Martinez, Francesca Fantini, Filippo Aschieri and Patrizia Bevilacqua

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Culturally Informed Evidence-Based Practices: Temas Assessment of Multicutural Children

- Pp. 38-50 (13)

Giuseppe Costantino, Robert G. Malgady, Louis H. Primavera and Elsa Cardalda

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Culturally Competent Psychotherapy for Hispanic/Latino Children and Adolescents

- Pp. 51-60 (10)

Robert G. Malgady

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Culturally Comptetent, Evidence-Based Treatment for Post WTC Disaster Trauma Symptoms in Latino Children

- Pp. 61-67 (7)

Giuseppe Costantino, Louis H. Primavera and Robert G. Malgady

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Cultural Competence in Assessment and Social Work Interventions: Implications for Practice and Professional Education

- Pp. 68-80 (13)

Nancy Gallina

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Contextual Considerations for Effective Mental Health Treatment of Asian Americans

- Pp. 81-91 (11)

Donna Wang

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Symbolic Violence in the Assessment of Bilingual/Multicultural English Language Learners: A Critical Theoretical Perspective

- Pp. 92-96 (5)

Reuben M. Castagno

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Human Science and Multicultural Assessment Practice

- Pp. 97-115 (19)

Richard H. Dana

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Index

- Pp. 116-130 (15)

Robert G. Malgady and Touro College

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Foreword

Reuben M. Castagno

Professor, Film and Education Research Academy, Columbia University and Department of Psychology, Touro College, New York

"In the midst of the constant noise of our modern world, We need to create sufficient silence to hear ourselves and others"

Fletcher, Sorrell, & Silva

This book is definitely a benchmark in the systematic study of cultural competence in the areas of assessment and intervention with ethnic minorities. Taken together, the chapters in this volume describe the extremely important developments of theory, measurement strategies, and significant findings about the long-term outcomes of research on cultural competence. The contributors to this important volume are critical architects of this area of rigorous research. The new knowledge about the ways and life-course development of cultural competence within the areas of assessment and intervention is paramount in bringing a much better understanding of the complexity on working and providing support to ethnic minorities. The chapters present rich research contributions from different disciplines, methodologies, and perspectives. Each chapter describes a critical piece in the history and development of the field and practice of cultural competence across the areas of psychology and social work.

The stage for understanding cultural competence is set right from the start on the book’s preface as a ‘commitment to diversity in social behavior.’ In the first chapter the author addresses issues related to comprehensive culturally competent assessment. This chapter highlights the need of comprehensive quality assessment and the importance of additional professional training. In chapter two, the researcher puts forward the critical area of bias in psychological measurement. The issue of reliability and valid assessment in psychological testing is presented and analyzed. The author presents the history of the efforts to measure intelligence right from its inception and the current trends in trying to avoid biases by providing appropriate clinical treatment to ethnic minorities. In chapters three and four, the authors captured the importance of multicultural assessment within the scope of TEMAS (Tell-Me-A-Story). The instrument TEMAS was developed from a dynamic-cognitive model integrating elements of cognitive, ego, and interpersonal psychology, with social-cognitive learning theory and narrative psychology. This is a powerful instrument for a new millennium that tries to incorporate our current understanding of the nature of cross-cultural/multicultural assessment.

The subsequent chapters five, six, seven, and eight captures the issues related to cultural competence within the theoretical framework of symbolic violence in assessment, psychotherapy, evidence-based treatment for post World Trade Center trauma symptoms in Latino children, and social work interventions and implications for practice and professional education. In the last two chapters, the book builds and breaks new ground in the conceptualization and practice of cultural competence. The authors provide important research on the effectiveness of mental health treatment of Asian Americans. In the area of mental health treatment for Asian Americans, the author discusses the barriers of treatment as a starting point for moving forward with possible strategies to increase the competency of mental health care. Overall, the chapters articulate important implications of the groundbreaking research and paramount topics described in this book. As researchers, educators, and clinicians from different disciplines study these chapters; new ideas, studies, and commitment to diversity certainly will be launched to further the specific lines of research described in each chapter. It is through these converging possible exploratory commitment to diversity in social behavior that we may be able to create a moment of silence long enough to hear ourselves and respond to others.

REFERENCE

Fletcher, J., Sorrell, J., & Silva, M. (2001). Harming patients in the name of quality of life. In N.Diekelmann (Ed.), Interpretive studies in healthcare and the human sciences: Vol. 1. Power oppression, and violence in healthcare and the human sciences. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin Press.


Preface

These chapters subscribe to a common theme, namely a commitment to diversity in social behavior. While concerns for diversity have been raised on numerous occasions, with increasing frequency over the past four decades, little progress has passed in implementing such concerns in clinical practice. A disturbing anecdote comes to mind as a case in point. I recall visiting Bellevue Hospital in New York City for a meeting with the Chair of psychiatry. Being a white man, dressed in suit and tie, the receptionist greeted me with a forlorn look, downtrodden. Perhaps she didn’t like her job or the people who entered on a daily basis. Nonetheless, I couldn’t help thinking, what if I was a poor minority person, possible with limited English proficiency, in dire need of psychiatric care, who happened to stumble in for treatment? The less than welcoming reception may have prompted me to walk out, and even exacerbate my psychiatry problem. Experiences such as this are one reason why more than half of mental health service utilizations by ethnic minority clients are terminated following their first visit.

Another interesting anecdote comes to mind. Giving a lecture at Lincoln Center in an auditorium replete with clinicians engaged in practice, my challenge, a bold one so it seems, was for someone to articulate precisely how they would treat a Dominican patient differently from someone born in Cuba, Puerto Rico or Mexico, or elsewhere for that matter. The unanimous response referred to “socioeconomic status” as the discerning factor. Cubans could afford treatment more readily than others, and were more likely to be insured. Dominicans were darker skinned and typically had fewer financial resources. Puerto Ricans didn’t keep their appointments, tended to be non-compliant and drop out of treatment. Given my own experience one needn’t wonder why. Although at the time, there was little representation of the Mexican American population in New York City, their plight went unanswered. Clearly, despite the rhetoric surrounding cultural awareness and culturally competent treatment, observation of what is translated into clinical practice suggests that the transition of theory into action has not fully taken place.

Over two-thirds of Americans receive treatment for depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and related disorders. Comorbidity is rarely diagnosed. These trends are greatly exacerbated among members of ethnic, cultural, and linguistic minority groups. The authors contributing to this volume share their clinical acumen and experiences, rooted in their evidence-based research. Our purpose is to bring issues attending assessment and treatment of ethnic minorities closer to the fore. Some of the leading authors on the topic, in psychology and social work, present their well earned clinical and research experiences in this Volume. Case studies are presented which are instructive and intriguing. They bring together a richness of a multidisciplinary approach to the topic.

A recent 2010 article in the New York Times is an example of current thinking. This article described how Mexican Americans are less likely to receive talk therapy or treatment of any kind. On the other hand, curiously, Puerto Ricans are proportionately over diagnosed with depression and receive less than adequate care relative to other groups, The message was to reach out to minorities to engage themselves in psychotherapy. But without a thorough understanding of culture and its nuances on part of the mental health service providers, alienation, stigma, and culturally based impediments rule. Consequently, the authors of this volume provide experiences, guidelines, and recommendations for assessment and treatment of their ever increasing ethnic minority clientele.

Robert G. Malgady
New York University
USA

List of Contributors

Editor(s):
Robert G. Malgady
New York University
USA




Contributor(s):
Filippo Aschieri
Dipartimento di Psicologia, Alta Scuola di Psicolgia "A Gemelli,"
Universita Cattolica di Milano
Milano
Italy


Patrizia Beviliacqua
Dipartimento di Psicologia, Alta Scuola di Psicolgia "A Gemelli,"
Universita Cattolica di Milano
Milano
Italy


Elsa B. Cardalda
Department of Psychology
University of Puerto Rico
San Juan
PR


Reuben M. Castagno
Graduate School of Psychology
Touro College
50 West 23rd Street
New York
NY
USA


Giuseppe Costantino
Graduate School of Psychology
Touro College
50 West 23rd Street
New York
NY
USA


Richard H. Dana
Portland State University Portland
Oregon
USA


Fransca Fantini
Dipartimento di Psicologia, Alta Scuola di Psicolgia "A Gemelli,"
Universita Cattolica di Milano
Milano
Italy


Nancy Gallina
School of Social Work
Touro College
New York
NY
USA


Robert G. Malgady
Lander Center for Research
Touro College
New York
NY
USA


Jose V. Martinez
Carlos Albizu University
San Juan
PR


Louis H. Primavera
Graduate School of Psychology, Touro College
New York
NY
USA


Donna Wang
School of Social Work, Touro College
New York
NY
USA




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