Historical Technology Developments in Plant Transformation

Book Series: Plant Transformation Technology Revolution in Last Three Decades


by

Yinghui Dan

DOI: 10.2174/97816080524861110101
eISBN: 978-1-60805-248-6, 2011
ISBN: 978-1-60805-532-6
ISSN: 2211-2936 (Print)



Recommend this eBook to your Library

Indexed in: Chemical Abstracts, EBSCO.

Plant transformation technology has played a critical role in advancing biotechnology and fundamental research and evolved as a scienc...[view complete introduction]

Table of Contents

Foreword

- Pp. i

Stanton B. Gelvin

Download Free

Preface

- Pp. ii

Yinghui Dan and David W. Ow

Download Free

List of Contributors

- Pp. iii-iv (2)

Yinghui Dan and David W. Ow

View Abstract Download Free

DNA Delivery Systems

- Pp. 3-24 (22)

Rangaraj Nandakumar, Subramanian Babu and Zeng-Yu Wang

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Chimeric Genes for Selection Systems and Reporter Makers

- Pp. 25-45 (21)

Morten Joersbo

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Organogenesis and Embryogenesis in Plant Genetic Transformation

- Pp. 46-54 (9)

Daivd R. Duncan

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Transformation Vectors and Expression of Foreign Genes in Higher Plants

- Pp. 55-76 (22)

Toshiyuki Komori, Jun Ueki and Toshihiko Komari

View Abstract Download Free

Cells/Tissues Conditioning for Facilitating T-DNA Delivery

- Pp. 77-107 (31)

Ming Cheng, Yin-Fu Chang, Paula M. Olhoft, Vinitha Cardoza, Fai-Ming Lai, Todd J. Jones and Allan R. Wenck

View Abstract Download Free

Marker-Free Plant Transformation

- Pp. 108-122 (15)

Ming Cheng, Yin-Fu Chang, Paula M. Olhoft, Vinitha Cardoza, Fai-Ming Lai, Todd J. Jones, Allan R. Wenck, Vibha Srivastava, M. Aydın Akbudak and Soumen Nandy

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Transformation of the Plastid Genome in Higher Plants

- Pp. 123-145 (23)

Nunzia Scotti, Daniela Gargano, Paolo Lenzi and Teodoro Cardi

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Index

- Pp. 146-148 (3)

Yinghui Dan and David W. Ow

View Abstract Download Free

Foreword

Plant genetic transformation has undergone numerous advances as new generations of transgenic organisms have evolved. The first generation of transgenic plants initiated in 1983 by near-simultaneous reports from three groups. For this first generation, merely recovering phenotypically normal plants constitutively expressing a selection marker gene and inheriting this marker in progeny represented a major technological breakthrough. As transformation and tissue culture methods progressed, numerous plant species were added to a growing list of transgenic organisms. These included crop species important for agriculture and model organisms such as Arabidopsis, allowing facile manipulation of genes for basic research. No longer was constitutive transgene expression sufficient for research and biotechnology purposes; regulated transgene expression became essential for this second generation of transgenic plants. As sophistication in transgene expression increased, scientists entered a new era of plant genetic transformation. Both scientific and regulatory needs directed development of the third generation of transgenic plants. These new requirements included single-copy transgene integration, mitigating problems with transgene silencing. Regulatory concerns necessitated the absence of vector “backbone” sequences from the host genome, and the ability to excise selection markers. This generation of transgenic plants began to address issues related to the quality of transgenic events, rather than just the ability to produce transgenic organisms.

Although much progress has been made in the past 30 years, a number of scientific and regulatory hurdles remain. These include genotype-independent transformation of major crop and horticultural species, stable and predictable transgene expression, and transformation frequencies high enough that selection-free transformation becomes feasible. This next generation of transgenic technologies and organisms is currently being developed in academic and industrial laboratories.

“Plant Transformation Technology Revolution In Last Three Decades” presents up-to-date discussions of the history of plant genetic transformation, the evolution of transgenic technologies, and their applications to specific crop species. The first volume of this e-book, entitled “Historical Technology Developments In Plant Transformation”, covers subjects including the historical origins of plant biotechnology, DNA delivery systems, tissue culture, and selection marker advances. Progress in addressing regulatory concerns is covered in chapters describing selection marker excision and the development of transgenic chloroplast expression systems.

The second volume of this series, tentatively entitled “Major Transformation Technologies in Economically and Theoretically Important Plant Species”, will discuss transformation of individual species representing plants important for food, ornamental, oil, fiber, and biofuel production.

“Plant Transformation Technology Revolution In Last Three Decades” provides to readers important developments in transgenic crop research. With chapters written by practicing experts in each field, this e-book promises to explore important aspects of plant agricultural biotechnology.

Stanton B. Gelvin
H. Edwin Umbarger Distinguished Professor of Biological Sciences
Purdue University, West Lafayette IN USA


Preface

Plant transformation has been the backbone technology that spawned a new transgenic crops industry with its first planting in 1994. Recent global market values according to ISAAA Brief were 7.5 and 10.5 billion USD in 2008 and 2009, respectively. The technology is also fueling its expansion beyond the traditional agriculture of food, feed and fiber, into new opportunities in transgenic plants for biopharmaceutics, bioremediation, and biofuels. Plant transformation is not merely a tool, but is in itself a scientific discipline that evolved from basic discoveries in plant pathology, cell biology, plant development, and transgene integration, expression, and transmission. Plant transformation technology has also been vital for advancing fundamental research. The first transgenic higher organism was tobacco reported in 1983-1984. It was these transgenic plants that had paved the research for transgenesis. Along the way, contributions were made on seminal discoveries in biology, such as the molecular elucidation of the first described mobile DNA element, the mechanisms of horizontal interkingdom gene transfer and the epigenetic regulation by RNAi. This EBook takes the readers from historic development to current state of the art, through its seven chapters written by the active practitioners from academia and industry. These chapters on DNA delivery, selection and report markers, plant regeneration, transformation vectors, in vitro conditioning to facilitate T-DNA delivery, marker-free plant transformation and plastid transformation provide comprehensive understanding and insight into a subject that will bear the relevance in our daily lives in the 21st century.

We wish to thank the contributing authors and the reviewer panel of Bentham Publisher for their contributions in time and critical suggestions and comments, as well as to Bentham Publisher and their team members for the opportunity to publish this work. We also thank our family members for their love and encouragement during the completion of this book.

Yinghui Dan
David W. Ow

List of Contributors

Editor(s):
Yinghui Dan
Institute for Advanced Learning and Research &
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
USA




Co-Editor(s):
David W Ow
South China Botanical Garden
China




Contributor(s):
M. Aydın Akbudak
Department of Crop, Soil & Environmental Sciences, Cell & Molecular Biology Program
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville
AR
USA


Subramanian Babu
School of Biosciences and Technology
VIT University
Vellore, 632014
India


Teodoro Cardi
CRA-ORT, Agriculture Research Council, Research Centre for Vegetable Crops
Pontecagnano
(SA), I-84098
Italy


Vinitha Cardoza
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA


Yin-Fu Chang
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA


Ming Cheng
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA


Daivd R. Duncan
Monsanto Co., 700 Chesterfield Parkway W
Chesterfield
Missouri
USA


Daniela Gargano
Centre for Organelle Research
University of Stavanger
N-4036 Stavanger
Norway


Morten Joersbo
Maribo Seed
Hojbygardvej 31, DK-4960 Holeby
Denmark


Todd J. Jones
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA


Toshihiko Komari
Plant Innovation Center, Japan Tobacco Inc.
700 Higashibara, Iwata
Shizuoka, 438-0802
Japan


Toshiyuki Komori
Plant Innovation Center, Japan Tobacco Inc.
700 Higashibara, Iwata
Shizuoka, 438-0802
Japan


Fai-Ming Lai
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA


Paolo Lenzi
Department of Biological Chemistry
John Innes Centre
Norwich NR4 7UH
UK


Rangaraj Nandakumar
Forage Improvement Division
The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
2510 Sam Noble Parkway
Ardmore
OK 73401
USA


Soumen Nandy
Department of Crop, Soil & Environmental Sciences
University of Arkansas
Fayetteville
AR
USA


Paula M. Olhoft
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA


Nunzia Scotti
CNR-IGV
Institute of Plant Genetics
I-80055 Portici (NA)
Italy


Vibha Srivastava
Department of Crop, Soil & Environmental Sciences, Department of Horticulture
Cell & Molecular Biology Program, University of Arkansas
Fayetteville
AR
USA


Jun Ueki
Plant Innovation Center
Japan Tobacco Inc.
700 Higashibara
Iwata
Shizuoka, 438-0802
Japan


Zeng-Yu Wang
Forage Improvement Division
The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation
2510 Sam Noble Parkway
Ardmore
OK, 73401
USA


Allan R. Wenck
BASF Plant Science LP, 26 Davis Dr
Research Triangle Park
NC, 27709
USA




Advertisement



Webmaster Contact: info@benthamscience.org Copyright © 2017 Bentham Science