Omics and Plant Abiotic Stress Tolerance


by

Narendra Tuteja

DOI: 10.2174/97816080505811110101
eISBN: 978-1-60805-058-1, 2011
ISBN: 978-1-60805-384-1

  
  


Indexed in: Scopus, Chemical Abstracts

Multiple biotic and abiotic environmental factors may constitute stresses that affect plant growth and yield in crop species. Advances...[view complete introduction]
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Table of Contents

Foreword , Pp. i

Hans J. Bohnert

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Preface , Pp. ii

Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill and Renu Tuteja

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Contributors , Pp. iii-v (3)

Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill and Renu Tuteja

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"Omics": Will Regulation and Activism Stifle Its Potential? , Pp. 1-9 (9)

Henry I. Miller

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Omics Approaches for Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants , Pp. 10-38 (29)

Prasanta K. Subudhi

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Plant Responses to Abiotic Stresses: Shedding Light on Salt, Drought, Cold and Heavy Metal Stress , Pp. 39-64 (26)

Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill and Renu Tuteja

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Genomic Overview of Ion Transporters in Plant Salt Tolerance , Pp. 65-75 (11)

Faical Brini, Kaouther Feki, Habib Khoudi, Moez Hanin and Khaled Masmoudi

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Transcriptomics Identifies Cold Stress Determinants in Arabidopsis , Pp. 76-81 (6)

John Einset

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Transcriptome Analysis of Polyamine Overproducers Reveals Activation of Plant Stress Responses and Related Signalling Pathways T , Pp. 82-90 (9)

F. Marco, T. Altabella, R. Alcazar, J. Cuevas, C. Bortolotti, M.E. Gonzalez, OA Ruiz, A.F. Tiburcio and P. Carrasco

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Abiotic stress in plants: From Genomics to Metabolomics , Pp. 91-120 (30)

A. Roychoudhury, Karabi Datta and S. K. Datta

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Epigenome and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants , Pp. 121-127 (7)

Sanjay Kapoor and Meenu Kapoor

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Rhizotoxic Ions: ‘Omics’ Approaches for Studying Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Plants , Pp. 128-132 (5)

Cheng-Ri Zhao, Yoshiharu Y Yamamoto and Hiroyuki Koyama

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Nitric Oxide, S-Nitrosoproteome and Abiotic Stress Signaling in Plants , Pp. 133-142 (10)

Jasmeet Kaur Abat and Renu Deswal

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Abscisic Acid in Abiotic Stress Tolerance: An ‘Omics’ Approach , Pp. 143-150 (8)

Kailash C. Bansal, Sangram K. Lenka and Narendra Tuteja

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The Role of RNA Silencing in Plant Stress Responses , Pp. 151-162 (12)

Ngoc Tuan Le and Ming-Bo Wang

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Systems Biology: A Promising Tool to Study Abiotic Stress Responses , Pp. 163-172 (10)

Konika Chawla, Pankaj Barah, Martin Kuiper and Atle M. Bones

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Index , Pp. 173-176 (4)

Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill and Renu Tuteja

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Foreword

Ten-thousand years of selection have turned wild species into established useful plants. A few hundred years of breeding with evermore sophistication have lead to the generation our extant crops. All of this progress has been achieved by phenotype observation, increasingly augmented by measurements. The concepts of evolutionary change, of genetics and genes, and finally the reality of DNA have been added during the last century. Plant biology and the crop-centered biological sciences as well, profited from the advances, but at the same time many biological disciplines lost sight of the organismic dimension in the pursuit of detail. A large number of plant species with intriguing evolutionary adaptations that had previously been studied were abandoned and replaced by focus on a handful of model species with fervent supporters and fierce detractors. To be sure, the focus on models provided immense new insights into the functioning of plants but the new insights became possible only because of a paradigm change. The steady and incremental advance in knowledge has been replaced by a view of plants as an integrated system of many processes and pathways. The sea change in conceptual approach and high-throughput experimentation has been accomplished by the availability of new technologies. These summarily termed 'omics' concepts have opened a way for evolutionary specialties to be studied and understood in previously unimaginable complexity.

The volume edited by Drs. Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill and Renu Tuteja places plant stress tolerance behaviour in this 'omics' context and does it well. The book succeeds in presenting a large variety of concepts, models and viewpoints. The book presents a wealth of excellent articles, both broad overviews as well as detailed accounts that discuss genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics principles aimed at advancing our understanding of plant abiotic stress tolerance phenomena. The chapters, written by experts in their respective fields, cover a large array of topics and interpret our recently dramatically enlarged view of the genetic basis of stressaffected plant development, biochemistry and physiology. The various contributions integrate the stress topic from the view of crop species as well as from the vantage of established models. This comprehensiveness should make this volume equally valuable not only to basic investigators and application-oriented plant scientists but also for teachers and students entering this field of plant biology.

Hans J. Bohnert, Ph.D.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana, IL
USA


Preface

"Take care of the earth and she will take care of you"

Anonymous

World population is increasing at an alarming rate and is expected to reach more than nine billion by the end of 2050, whereas, plant productivity is being seriously limited by various abiotic stresses all over the world. Global climatic pattern is becoming more unpredictable with increased occurrence of drought, flood, storm, heat waves, and sea water intrusion. It has been estimated that abiotic stresses are the principal cause for decreasing the average yield of major crops by more than 50%, which causes losses worth hundreds of millions of dollars each year. Therefore, to feed the world population maintaining crop productivity even under unfavourable environment is a major area of concern for all nations. Developing crop plants with ability to tolerate abiotic stresses is need of the day which demands modern novel strategies for thorough understanding of plant's response to abiotic stresses. In particular, an array of new innovative "omics" tools, comprising of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, are evolving at rapid pace, which is empowering the scientists to systematically analyze the genome at various levels and their effect on phenotypic variability. Omics tools particularly genomics allowed the use of important strategies like genome-wide expression profiling which is useful to identify genes associated with stress response. Furthermore, proteomics helped a lot to analyze the relationship between gene expression (transcriptomics) and metabolism (metabolomics). Metabolomic studies, thus along with transcriptomics and proteomics, and their integration with systems biology, will lead to strategies to alter cellular metabolism for adaptation to abiotic stress conditions.

This volume deals with up-to-date information on omics approaches for crop improvement and abiotic stress tolerance. The first and second chapters describe the importance of omics and its benefits for crop improvement and related issues. Third chapter will deal with up-to-date literature on major abiotic stresses like cold, drought, salt and heavy metals, their effect on plant performance and possible measures to counteract it. The following chapters from four to seven will deal with the use of omics approaches like genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics and many more for crop tolerance to various abiotic stresses. Chapter eight uncovers the epigenetic studies in reference to abiotic stress tolerance. Chapter nine deals with rizotoxic ions and importance of omics approaches has been uncovered in detail. Chapter ten and eleven will discuss the role of nitric oxide, S-nitrosoproteome and abscissic acid in abiotic stress signaling in plants. Chapter twelve is summarizing the importance of RNA silencing in plants following various stresses. Finally, in the chapter thirteen, system biology approaches has been taken into consideration for abiotic stress tolerance.

The editors and contributing authors hope that this book will include a practical update on our knowledge of abiotic stress tolerance and lead to new discussions and efforts to the use of omics tools for the improvement of crop plants in the era of global climatic change.

We would like to thank Prof. Hans Bohnert for writing the foreword and Bentham Science Publishers, particularly Manager Bushra Siddiqui and Salma, for their support and efforts.

Narendra Tuteja, Sarvajeet Singh Gill and Renu Tuteja
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
India

List of Contributors

Editor(s):
Narendra Tuteja
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology
India




Contributor(s):
Antonio F. Tiburcio
Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal
Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona
Diagonal 643
Barcelona, 08028
Spain


Aryadeep Roychoudhury
Department of Botany
Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Laboratory, University of Calcutta
35, Ballygunge Circular Road
Kolkata, 700 019
India


Atle M. Bones
Department of Biology,
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Høgskoleringen 5
Trondheim, NO-7491
Norway


Cheng-Ri Zhao
Applied Plant Science
Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences Gifu University
Gifu, 501-1193
Japan


Cristina Bortolotti
Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal
Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona
Diagonal 643
Barcelona, 08028
Spain


Faïçal Brini
Plant Molecular Genetic Laboratory
Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax (CBS) Route Sidi Mansour
Km 6, B.P ''1177'' 3018
Sfax
Tunisia


Habib Khoudi
Plant Molecular Genetic Laboratory
Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax (CBS) Route Sidi Mansour
Km 6, B.P ''1177'' 3018
Sfax
Tunisia


Henry I. Miller
The Hoover Institution,Stanford University, Stanford
Stanford
California , 94305-6010
USA


Hiroyuki Koyama
Applied Plant Science
Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences,Gifu University
Gifu, 501-1193
Japan


Jasmeet Kaur
Department of Botany, Abat Plant Molecular Physiology
Biochemistry and Proteomics Laboratory, University of Delhi
Delhi, 110007
India


John Einset
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences
Norwegian University of Life Sciences (UMB)
P. O. Box 5003
Aas, 1432
Norway


Juan C. Cuevas
Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal
Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona
Diagonal 643
Barcelona, 08028
Spain


Kailash C. Bansal
National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
Indian Agricultural Research Institute
New Delhi, 110 012
India


Kaouther Feki
Plant Molecular Genetic Laboratory
Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax (CBS) Route Sidi Mansour
Km 6, B.P ''1177''
Sfax, 3018
Tunisia


Karabi Datta
Department of Botany
Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Laboratory
University of Calcutta, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road
Kolkata, 700 019
India


Khaled Masmoudi
Plant Molecular Genetic Laboratory
Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax (CBS) Route Sidi Mansour
Km 6, B.P ''1177''
Sfax, 3018
Tunisia


Konika Chawla
Department of Biology
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Høgskoleringen 5
Trondheim, NO-7491
Norway


M.E González
IIB-INTECH, Camino Circ
Laguna km 6,(B7130IWA) Chascomús
Buenos Aires
Argentina


Martin Kuiper
Department of Biology
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Høgskoleringen 5
Trondheim, NO-7491
Norway


Meenu Kapoor
University School of Biotechnology
Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University
Delhi
India


Ming-Bo Wang
CSIRO Plant Industry,
GPO Box 1600
Canberra, ACT 2601
Australia


Moez Hanin
Plant Molecular Genetic Laboratory
Centre of Biotechnology of Sfax (CBS) Route Sidi Mansour
Km 6, B.P ''1177''
Sfax, 3018
Tunisia


Narendra Tuteja
Plant Molecular Biology Group
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg
New Delhi, 110 067
India


Ngoc Tuan Le
CSIRO Plant Industry
GPO Box 1600
Canberra
ACT, 2601
Australia


Oscar A. Ruiz
IIB-INTECH, Camino Circ
Laguna km 6,B7130IWA, Chascomús
Buenos Aires
Argentina


Pankaj Barah
Department of Biology
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Høgskoleringen 5
Trondheim, NO-7491
Norway


Pedro Carrasco
Departament de Bioquímica i Biologia Molecular
Universitat de València, Facultat de Ciències Biològiques
Dr. Moliner 50, 46100 Burjassot
València
Spain


Prasanta K Subudhi
School of Plant, Environmental, & Soil Sciences
Agricultural Center
215 M.B. Sturgis Hall, Louisiana State University
Baton Rouges
LA, 70803
USA


Renu Deswal
Plant Molecular Physiology, Department of Botany
Biochemistry and Proteomics Laboratory, University of Delhi
Delhi, 110007
India


Renu Tuteja
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg
New Delhi, 110 067
India


Ruben Alcázar
IIB-INTECH, Camino Circ
Laguna km 6,(B7130IWA) Chascomús
Buenos Aires
Argentina


Sangram K. Lenka
National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
Indian Agricultural Research Institute
New Delhi, 110 012
India


Sanjay Kapoor
Department of Plant Molecular Biology
University of Delhi
South Campus Benito Juarez road
New Delhi
India


Sarvajeet S. Gill
Plant Molecular Biology Group
International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg
New Delhi, 110 067
India


Swapn K. Datta
Department of Botany
Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Laboratory
University of Calcutta, 35, Ballygunge Circular Road
Kolkata, 700 019
India


Teresa Altabella
Unitat de Fisiologia Vegetal
Facultat de Farmàcia, Universitat de Barcelona
Diagonal 643
Barcelona, 08028
Spain


Yoshiharu Y. Yamamoto
Applied Plant Science
Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Gifu University
Gifu, 501-1193
Japan




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