Computers: Classical, Quantum and Others

Book Series: Algorithms for Construction of Reality in Physics


by

Sergey P. Suprun, Anatoly P. Suprun

DOI: 10.2174/97816080534901120101
eISBN: 978-1-60805-349-0, 2012
ISBN: 978-1-60805-596-8

  
  


Indexed in: Scopus

This volume elaborates upon functioning of a quantum computer and the analysis of mind phenomenon in a natural scientific paradigm. Ma...[view complete introduction]
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Table of Contents

Foreword , Pp. i

Viktor Ovsyuk
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Preface , Pp. ii-iii (2)

Sergey P. Suprun and Anatoly P. Suprun
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List of Contributing Authors , Pp. iv

Sergey P. Suprun and Anatoly P. Suprun
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Introduction , Pp. 3-7 (5)

Sergey P. Suprun and Anatoly P. Suprun
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Classical Computer , Pp. 8-21 (14)

Sergey P. Suprun and Anatoly P. Suprun
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Quantum Computer , Pp. 22-120 (99)

Sergey P. Suprun and Anatoly P. Suprun
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Index , Pp. 121-123 (3)

Sergey P. Suprun and Anatoly P. Suprun
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Foreword

After 100 years of its progress, quantum mechanics still continues to amaze anyone who tries to understand it not restricting himself or herself to mere experimental facts and mathematical machinery. It is appropriate here to mention Richard Feynman, an outstanding physicist, who said that everybody uses the apparatus of quantum mechanics without understanding quantum mechanics. We are already accustomed to that there are efficient algorithms for computing properties of quantum systems without entering into their meaning. The interest to these problems has recently revived in connection with a heavy coverage and expectations associated with a quantum computer. The terms such as mixed states, teleportation, quantum algorithms, and others are becoming familiar not only in the scientific literature but in other fields as well. However, it is difficult to speak about the issues that lack understanding even at a professional level. So far, there have been many attempts to interpret experimental facts from the field of quantum mechanics based on both corpuscular and wave descriptions, involving a pilot wave, and even parallel universes. All these attempts were made because the models intended to logically solve the conflict at the level of the already established notions without interfering with the geneses of these notions. This monograph, written by a psychologist and a physicist, analyzes the process of how our concepts of reality have been formed at the preconscious and conscious levels. The well-known problems in physics are used here as a touchstone for testing the capabilities of the proposed method of psychosemantic analysis. Despite that several postulates of the authors are disputable, the overall monograph deserves attention at least because it is the first attempt to puzzle out the psychological foundation of our physical knowledge. Presumably, the hypotheses proposed by the authors will motivate other researchers to look at the problems in quantum mechanics from another standpoint and notice the aspects yet beyond our field of vision. This monograph will be useful to a wide range of specialists, students, and everybody who is interested in the modern problems in science.

Prof. Viktor Ovsyuk
Institute of Semiconductor Physics
Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences
Novosibirsk
Russia


Preface

The subject of classical physics is description of the changes in physical properties of objects in a space–time continuum. Consideration of exclusively object–object interactions held out a hope of completely excluding an individual observer (and, correspondingly, a subjective component) from the paradigm of natural science. However, the special theory of relativity, formulating the space–time transformations during the description of objects by observers in different frames of reference, implicitly introduces an observer into physics. Actually, the laws for transformation of reality from the standpoints of different frames of reference—those of an observer and the associated system of reference—were introduced. Thus, even the classical physics failed to avoid completely the participation of a person, an observer. Remaining within the frame of an object-based approach to description of reality and regarding this as the only method possible, we come to the paradoxes of quantum mechanics. We assume that to introduce this field of knowledge, currently being a formal tool, into the range of our comprehension, it is necessary to admit the following postulates:

  • The presence of an observer in any scientific theory is a natural fact, since it is the observer who is a “receiver” of signals and an “interpreter” of information;
  • There exist evolutionarily established algorithms for assemblage of sensations (the first signal system) into object concepts realized in a certain mental space. This subjective component is also objective and should be taken into account when interpreting our concepts of reality;
  • Over a long-term social development, the second signal system has acquired a semiotic object-based method for reinterpreting the reality in our consciousness relying not only on the reality per se “beyond sensations” but rather on its mirror image on a certain “mental map” that procreates our space–time concept of the world; and
  • Such analytical description is not the only possible method for simulating reality. Another one is a systems approach, implying the absence of partitioning within the limits of a system and, correspondingly, the absence of space–time relationships. (In particular, the integral physical system “emitter–barrier–screen” displays interference properties, while any attempts to part it into objects immediately lead to paradoxes.) This monograph is an attempt of consistent substantiation of the described standpoint by the example of quantum physics. The monograph comprises introduction and two parts and is written as a free discussion of the problems in question. The first part briefs the main principles underlying the operation of classical and quantum computers. The main attention there is focused on experimental facts, their interpretation, and analysis of the paradoxes in quantum mechanics. The title of this monograph requires a separate explanation. The research in the field of informatics and formalization of the operation principles of classical and quantum computers are a mirror image of our own algorithms of consciousness. Actually, the mental processes of coding and logical reasoning have been modeled over an extended time period. Be it a conscious level or not, one more reality—a virtual one—has been created step by step within our reality with the help of computing technique. Similar to the Russian matryoshkas, the dolls nested into one another, these realities in part repeated themselves. Most likely, this route in science is not accidental. It looks most promising when following it with a goal in mind. This does not imply a reduction of the activity of a man of sense to functioning of a certain automaton. However, following this way, we can try to formalize the describable things, which is considered in the first part of this monograph, as well as the characters that distinguish a man from an automaton, which will be described in the second part, now in press. All this also influenced the style of the monograph, making it multilayered. Presumably, this (as well as the content itself, extending beyond the traditional scope) requires certain efforts from a reader. The main thing for the authors was to consistently rationalize the initial postulates as much as it was possible, and we would be grateful for any criticism related to their essence.


Sergey P. Suprun, PhD
Laboratory of Heterostructure Physics and Technology
Institute of Semiconductor Physics
Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences
Novosibirsk
Russia

Anatoly P. Suprun, PhD
Laboratory for Cognitive Researches
Institute for System Analysis
Russian Academy of Sciences
Moscow
Russia

List of Contributors

Author(s):
Sergey P. Suprun
Institute of Semiconductor Physics
Institute for System Analysis
Russia


Anatoly P. Suprun
Institute of Semiconductor Physics
Institute for System Analysis
Russia




Contributor(s):
Sergey P. Suprun
Laboratory of Heterostructure Physics and Technology
Institute of Semiconductor Physics
Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences
Novosibirsk
Russia


Anatoly P. Suprun
Laboratory for Cognitive Researches
Institute for System Analysis
Russian Academy of Sciences
Moscow
Russia




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