Rab GTPases and Membrane Trafficking


by

Guangpu Li

DOI: 10.2174/97816080536501120101
eISBN: 978-1-60805-365-0, 2012
ISBN: 978-1-60805-391-9

  
  


Indexed in: Chemical Abstracts, Scopus

Ypt/Rab GTPases form the largest branch of the Ras-related small GTPase superfamily and regulate intracellular membrane trafficking in...[view complete introduction]
PDF US $
- Single user / Non-Library usage: 79
- Multi user / Library usage: 316
Print-On-Demand (P.O.D): *95
Special Offer for Single user / Non-Library usage (PDF + P.O.D): *134

*(Excluding Mailing and Handling)
Purchase: Book Chapters
Download Flyers

Table of Contents

Foreword , Pp. i

Philip D. Stahl

Download Free

Preface , Pp. ii

Guangpu Li and Nava Segev

Download Free

List of Contributors , Pp. iii-vi (4)

Guangpu Li and Nava Segev

Download Free

Ypt/Rab GTPases and Intracellular Membrane Trafficking: An Overview , Pp. 3-17 (15)

Guangpu Li and Nava Segev

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

The Golgi Gatekeepers: Ypt1-Rab1 and Ypt31/32-Rab11 , Pp. 18-33 (16)

David Taussig, Shu H. Chen and Nava Segev

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Rab6 GTPase , Pp. 34-46 (13)

Bruno Goud and Anna Akhmanova

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Polarized Exocytosis in Yeast: Sec4p , Pp. 47-54 (8)

Andreas Knödler, Vishnu Ganesan and Wei Guo

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Masterclass with Rab3 and Rab27: Orchestrating Regulated Secretion , Pp. 55-76 (22)

François Darchen and Claire Desnos

View Abstract Download Free

Functions of Rab27a in Melanocytes and Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes , Pp. 77-92 (16)

John A. Hammer III and Xufeng Wu

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Early Endocytosis: Rab5, Rab21, and Rab22 , Pp. 93-107 (15)

Guangpu Li

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Role of Rab4 in Transport through the Endosomal System , Pp. 108-122 (15)

Emma Martinez Sanchez, Ioana Popa, Magda Deneka and Peter van der Sluijs

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Rab11a, Rab8a and Myosin V: Regulators of Recycling and Beyond , Pp. 123-131 (9)

James R. Goldenring, Joseph T. Roland and Lynne A. Lapierre

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Role of Rab7/Ypt7 in Organizing Membrane Trafficking at the Late Endosome , Pp. 132-143 (12)

Mirjana Nordmann, Christian Ungermann and Margarita Cabrera

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Transport from Late Endosomes to the Golgi: Rab9 GTPase , Pp. 144-154 (11)

Eric J. Espinosa and Suzanne R. Pfeffer

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Novel Rab GTPases , Pp. 155-168 (14)

Maria Luisa Rodrigues and José B. Pereira-Leal

View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Index , Pp. 169-172 (4)

Guangpu Li and Nava Segev

Download Free

Foreword

Since the 19th century, when Metchnikoff fed fragments of blue litmus paper to phagocytes and observed that they turned red, indicating the presence of an “acid compartment”, biologists and physicians have been intrigued with the mechanisms of membrane internalization and trafficking and their implications for understanding physiology. In the 20th century, when much was already known at the morphological level about cell secretion and endocytosis, a major advance, the discovery of the Ypt/Rab family of GTPases, heralded the entry of an era that has propelled research in membrane trafficking into the 21st century. The discovery of Ypt1 in yeast and the subsequent discovery of the Rab GTPases in mammalian cells has revealed a vast network of interacting transport/trafficking pathways in cells not unlike, metaphorically speaking, a national highway system for packaging and distributing cargo and products from one location to another.

The course of evolution has been characterized by several large expansions in the signaling repertoire of cells and tissues accompanied by the five-fold expansion in the Rab GTPase catalog from yeast to man. This expansion, along with the corresponding need for additional Rab-specific effectors, motors, exchange factors and GAPs, has broadened our understanding of the immense impact of the Ypt/Rab family on human physiology and health.

A new offering by Li and Segev entitled “Rab GTPases and Membrane Trafficking” brings us up to date on many of the recent developments in Ypt/Rab biology and physiology. Following an excellent introduction by the Li and Segev that touches on many of the recent advances in this rapidly developing field, a collection of a dozen chapters focus on selected Ypt/Rabs and the transport and signaling functions that they oversee. A superb collection of contributors brings both diversity and substance to the volume while highlighting the novelty of individual Ypt/Rab GTPases. The last selection on the evolution of the Ypt/Rab family provides an excellent finale. The eBook makes good use of cartoons, is amply referenced and should be of great value to graduate students and aficionados alike.

Philip D. Stahl
Washington University
St. Louis,MO
USA


Preface

Ypt/Rab GTPases, which form the largest branch of the Ras-related small GTPase superfamily, regulate intracellular membrane trafficking in all eukaryotes. Like other GTPases, Ypt/Rab proteins act as molecular switches that alternate between the GTP-bound active and the GDP-bound inactive conformations. In their active form Ypt/Rabs interact with effectors, which in turn promote specialized functions in intracellular trafficking through the exocytic and endocytic pathways. Since their discovery over two decades ago, a wealth of knowledge has accumulated about the roles that Ypt/Rab proteins play in vesicular transport steps including vesicle budding, movement, and fusion, but a united mechanism remains elusive and the subject remains a very active area of research. In recent years, Ypt/Rabs and trafficking have emerged as important players in other cellular processes, such as signal transduction, cell growth and differentiation. Importantly, Rabs have been implicated in various human diseases ranging from diabetes to cancer, justifying a timely eBook on the subject.

This eBook covers well-characterized Ypt/Rabs involved in both exocytic and endocytic pathways as well as newly identified and uncharacterized Rabs. Chapter 1 provides an overview of the general principles of the Ypt/Rab GTPase cycle and the vesicular trafficking steps regulated by them. Chapters 2-6 describe the regulation and functions of exocytic Rabs, including Ypt1-Rab1, Ypt31/Ypt32-Rab11, Rab6, Sec4, Rab3, and Rab27. In yeast, Ypt1 and Sec4, the founding members of the Ypt/Rab family, control the first and final steps of the exocytic pathway, respectively. Ypt31/Ypt32-Rab11 and Ypt6-Rab6 regulate traffic through the Golgi complex. On the other hand, Rab3 and Rab27 are found only in higher eukaryotes, are specifically expressed in secretory cells and play a role in regulated secretion. Chapters 7-11 describe endocytic and recycling Rabs, including Rab5, Rab21, Rab22, Rab4, Rab8, Rab11, Rab7, and Rab9. Members of the Rab5 sub-family, Rab5, Rab21, and Rab22 regulate early endosomal sorting, fusion and movement, whereas Rab4, Rab8 and Rab11 regulate recycling pathways. Rab7 and Rab9 regulate transport from late endosomes to lysosomes and the Golgi, respectively. The final chapter, Chapter 12, describes newly identified and uncharacterized Rabs, which represent a great majority of the 7,500 Rabs identified in 250 sequenced genomes. Rabs with unknown function have usually emerged late in evolution and are expressed in specific tissues at low levels.

By covering Ypt/Rab GTPases in one eBook, a comprehensive picture emerges in which each Ypt/Rab controls multiple vesicular trafficking steps via interactions with multiple effectors. This eBook should provide a useful resource for researchers, teachers and students interested in the field.

Guangpu Li
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
USA

Nava Segev
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
The University of Illinois at Chicago
USA

List of Contributors

Editor(s):
Guangpu Li
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
USA




Contributor(s):
Anna Akhmanova
Department of Biology
Utrecht University
The Netherlands


Margarita Cabrera
Department of Biology/Chemistry
University of Osnabrück
Barbarastrasse 13
Osnabrück, 49076
Germany


Shu H. Chen
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago
IL, 60607
USA


François Darchen
CNRS/Université Paris Descartes UMR 8192
Centre Universitaire des Saints-Pères
47 rue des Saints-Pères
Paris, 75006
France


Magda Deneka
Department of Cell Biology
University Medical Center Utrecht
Utrecht
GA, 3508
The Netherlands


Claire Desnos
CNRS/Université Paris Descartes UMR 8192
Centre Universitaire des Saints-Pères
47 rue des Saints-Pères
Paris, 75006
France


Eric J. Espinosa
Department of Biochemistry
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford
CA, 94305-5307
USA


Vishnu Ganesan
Department of Biology
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
PA, 19104-6018
USA


James R. Goldenring
Departments of Surgery and Cell and Developmental Biology Epithelial Biology Center
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
2213 Garland Ave
Nashville
TN, 37232-2733
USA


Bruno Goud
Institut Curie
CNRS UMR144
26 rue d'Ulm
Paris cedex 05, 75248
France


Wei Guo
Department of Biology
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
PA, 19104-6018
USA


John A. Hammer
Laboratory of Cell Biology
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda
MD, 20824
USA


Andreas Knödler
Department of Biology
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
PA, 19104-6018
USA


Lynne A. Lapierre
Departments of Surgery and Cell and Developmental Biology Epithelial Biology Center
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
2213 Garland Ave
Nashville
TN, 37232-2733
USA


Guangpu Li
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Oklahoma City
OK, 73104
USA


Mirjana Nordmann
Department of Biology/Chemistry
University of Osnabrück
Barbarastrasse 13
Osnabrück, 49076
Germany


José B. Pereira-Leal
Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência
Rua da Quinta Grande 6
Portugal


Suzanne R. Pfeffer
Department of Biochemistry
Stanford University School of Medicine
Stanford
CA, 94305-5307
USA


Ioana Popa
Department of Cell Biology
University Medical Center Utrecht
Utrecht
GA, 3508
The Netherlands


Maria Luisa Rodrigues
Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência
Rua da Quinta Grande 6
Portugal


Joseph T. Roland
Departments of Surgery and Cell and Developmental Biology Epithelial Biology Center
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine
2213 Garland Ave
Nashville
TN, 37232-2733
USA


Emma Martinez Sanchez
Department of Cell Biology
University Medical Center Utrecht
Utrecht
GA, 3508
The Netherlands


Nava Segev
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago
IL, 60607
USA


Peter van der Sluijs
Department of Cell Biology
University Medical Center Utrecht
Utrecht
GA, 3508
The Netherlands


David Taussig
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago
IL, 60607
USA


Christian Ungermann
Department of Biology/Chemistry
University of Osnabrück
Barbarastrasse 13
Osnabrück, 49076
Germany


Xufeng Wu
Laboratory of Cell Biology
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute
National Institutes of Health
Bethesda
MD, 20824
USA




Advertisement


Webmaster Contact: urooj@benthamscience.org Copyright © 2014 Bentham Science