The Mechanical Vibration: Therapeutic Effects and Applications


by

Raoul Saggini

DOI: 10.2174/97816810850811170101
eISBN: 978-1-68108-508-1, 2017
ISBN: 978-1-68108-509-8



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In rehabilitation medicine, the therapeutic application of vibration energy in specific clinical treatments and in sport rehabilitatio...[view complete introduction]

Table of Contents

Foreword

- Pp. i

Nicola Maffulli

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Preface

- Pp. ii-iii (2)

Raoul Saggini

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Acknowledgements

- Pp. iv

Raoul Saggini

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About the Editor

- Pp. v

Raoul Saggini

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List of Contributors

- Pp. vi

Raoul Saggini

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The Study of Vibrations: Mathematical Modelling and Classifications

- Pp. 3-24 (22)

Enrico Corsetti and Michele Casciani

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The Applied Mechanical Vibration as Whole-body and Focal Vibration

- Pp. 25-88 (64)

Raoul Saggini and Emilio Ancona

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The Applied Mechanical Vibration as Ultrasound Energy

- Pp. 89-180 (92)

Rosa Grazia Bellomo, Simona Maria Carmignano and Raoul Saggini

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The Applied Mechanical Vibration as Extracorporeal Shock Wave

- Pp. 181-219 (39)

Maria Cristina D`Agostino, Simona Maria Carmignano and Andrea Saggini

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The Electromagnetic Vibration: Physical Principles and Biomolecular Effects

- Pp. 220-242 (23)

Livio Giuliani, Elisabetta Giuliani, Manuela Lucarelli and Raoul Saggini

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Appendix

- Pp. 243-259 (17)

Raoul Saggini

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Subject Index

- Pp. 260-270 (11)

Raoul Saggini

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Foreword

Vibrations. Good vibes. Bad vibes. Too much of vibes. Not enough of them. When I first heard of vibrations, I was in my teens, and it was all about the good vibes coming from great music bands. After that, as an orthopaedic trainee, I was taught that vibrations were bad: helicopter pilots and truck drivers were exposed to exactly the kind of vibrations which induced asynchronous contractions of the back muscles, and had direct deleterious effects on the vertebral discs. The result includes low back pain and osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine. Following this, somebody had the great idea to test vibrations in clinical practice. Lo and behold, some science was injected into vibration science, and it was found that if too much is not too good (actually, it is pretty bad), a measured amount of the right kind of vibration can bring good. Prof. Saggini has been on the forefront of this “good vibes movement”.

Prof. Saggini is a thoughtful, skilled clinician, armed with foresight and rigour. He started observing and experimenting, and has been able to produce much of the present day scientific evidence on this fascinating topic. “Mechanical vibration: therapeutic effects and applications” show, as Prof. Saggini would say, that “nothing rests”. Indeed, we are moving all the time, and vibration is at the centre of our life.

Progressing from the basic sciences of vibration, the scene is set for clinical applications, in a variety of forms. The truth, however, is that: this edition of “Mechanical vibration: therapeutic effects and applications”, provides the beginning, and, through the strict scientific work that Prof. Saggini will continue to perform, more truth will come out of it.

Enjoy!

Nicola Maffulli
Professor of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery
Consultant Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeon
Director of the Department of Musculoskeletal Disorders
School of Medicine Surgery and Dentistry, University of Salerno
Italy


Preface

Current evidence shows that the entire Universe vibrates; gravitational waves may be regarded as ripples in the curvature of space-time propagating in an oscillatory fashion and travelling outward from the source.

Any given complex body is capable of vibrating in several different ways, each one being characterized by its own frequency.

The inorganic matter is made up of atoms that are in a constant state of motion; depending on the atomic speed, inorganic matter will exist in a solid, liquid, or gaseous state. By the same token, the human body is made up of atoms in continuous vibration, the latter being necessary for the homeostatic maintenance of the organism.

Several essential cellular processes, including cytoskeleton activity, enzymatic reactions, chromosome packaging and replication, nucleic acids transcription and translation, and protein folding and unfolding, generate forces resulting in intracellular movement. For instance, protein polar oscillation during cell division and cytoskeleton assembly greatly contribute to such intracellular dynamics by generating polarizing ionic currents and charge-induced nanoscale movements. The net effect of these events is the vibration of the entire cell and its components.

It is currently thought that the transduction of intracellular movements allows the cell to emit vibration waves carrying information about intracellular metabolic status. The latter mirrors the energy internal to the cell, being the proportional to intensity and frequency of the ensuing vibrations.

Mechanotransduction analysis assesses the causal relationship between mechanical forces, intracellular signaling, and subsequent changes in cell behavior. Indeed, mechanical forces seem to play a crucial role in several aspects of living tissues, including organization, growth, maturation, and normal functioning.

Physical signals are known to travel faster than signaling through chemical mediators, the latter being limited by dependence on diffusion. Accordingly, physical signals appear to represent a more effective way of cell signaling whenever a rapid response is required.

The human body is constantly subjected to vibrations deriving from the surrounding environment, including sources such as industrial machinery as well as common means of transport (terrestrial, nautical, and aerial). Overall, such vibrations may be viewed as different forms of the same primitive mechanical oscillation – i.e., endless “variations on the theme” acting at both the macroscopic and the microscopic level. Any vibration or oscillation will induce a tuning response by the cell through changes in signal transduction, resulting in potentially healthy (therapeutic) or adverse effects. Indeed, to quote Paracelsus, «Omnia venenum sunt: nec sine veneno quicquam existit. Dosis sola facit, ut venenum non fit».

In sum, it appears indisputable that nothing rests: everything surrounding the human body vibrates at an exclusive frequency, and so does the human body. Accordingly, it seems crucial to develop a deeper understanding of the physical parameters of vibration (amplitude, frequency, direction of the stimulation, and duration of the exposure), as well as to gain better knowledge regarding ways to modulate vibrations in order to improve body homeostasis by means of:

  • relief of pain and pathological inflammation, both acute and chronic;
  • bone and soft tissues regeneration, and musculoskeletal functional improvement;
  • amelioration of common neurological diseases, including motor impairment.

My hope in writing this book is to clarify further the medical role of vibrations in improving human health.

Raoul Saggini
Full Professor, Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Department of Medical Oral and Biotechnological Sciences
Director of the School of Specialty in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
“Gabriele d’Annunzio” University, Chieti-Pescara
Italy
National Coordinator of Schools of Specialty in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine

List of Contributors

Editor(s):
Raoul Saggini




Contributor(s):
Emilio Ancona
School of Specialty in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
“Gabriele d’Annunzio” University
Chieti-Pescara
Italy


Rosa Grazia Bellomo
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical Oral and Biotechnological Sciences
“Gabriele d’Annunzio” University
Chieti-Pescara
Italy


Simona Maria Carmignano
School of Specialty in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
“Gabriele d’Annunzio” University
Chieti-Pescara
Italy


Michele Casciani
Chief Executive Officer
“Salvator Mundi International Hospital”
Rome
Italy


Enrico Corsetti
Research and Development Unit Director
“Salvator Mundi International Hospital”
Rome
Italy


Maria Cristina D’Agostino
Head of Shock Waves Therapy and Research Centre, Humanitas Research Hospital, Adjunct Professor
“Humanitas” University
Rozzano
Italy


Elisabetta Giuliani
International Commission for Electromagnetic Safety (ICEMS)
Venice
Italy


Livio Giuliani
International Commission for Electromagnetic Safety (ICEMS)
Venice
Italy
/
Istituto per la Medicina Molecolare “Giuliano Preparata” SCE, Rome-Copenhagen Manuela Lucarelli International Commission for Electromagnetic Safety (ICEMS), Venice, Italy Istituto Nazionale per l’Assicurazione contro gli Infortuni sul Lavoro e le malattie professionali (INAIL)
Rome-Copenhagen
Italy


Manuela Lucarelli
International Commission for Electromagnetic Safety (ICEMS)
Venice
Italy
/
Istituto Nazionale per l’Assicurazione contro gli Infortuni sul Lavoro e le malattie professionali (INAIL)
Rome
Italy


Andrea Saggini
Dermatology Specialist Anatomic Pathology, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention
University of Rome Tor Vergata
Rome
Italy


Raoul Saggini
Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Department of Medical Oral and Biotechnological Sciences
Director of the School of Specialty in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, “Gabriele d’Annunzio” University
Chieti-Pescara
Italy
/
National Coordinator of Schools of Specialty in Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine





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