Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in Modern Carbon-Based Nanomaterials

Book Series: Frontiers in Magnetic Resonance

Volume 1

by

Dariya Savchenko, Abdel Hadi Kassiba

DOI: 10.2174/97816810869341180101
eISBN: 978-1-68108-693-4, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-68108-694-1
ISSN: 2589-7071 (Print)
ISSN: 2589-708X (Online)



Recommend this eBook to your Library



This volume presents information about several topics in the field of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study of carbon-containing...[view complete introduction]
US $
Buy Personal eBook
99
Order Library eBook
396
Order Printed Copy
*119
Order PDF + Printed Copy (Special Offer)
*168

*(Excluding Mailing and Handling)

🔒Secure Checkout Personal information is secured with SSL technology

Table of Contents

Foreword

- Pp. i
Alexander I. Shames
Download Free

Preface

- Pp. ii
Dariya Savchenko and Abdel Hadi Kassiba
Download Free

List of Contributors

- Pp. iii-iv (2)
Dariya Savchenko and Abdel Hadi Kassiba
Download Free

Fundamentals of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance in Modern Carbon-based Materials

- Pp. 1-35 (35)
Sushil K. Misra
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Resolution of EPR Signals in Graphene-based Materials from Few Layers to Nanographites

- Pp. 36-66 (31)
Francesco Tampieri and Antonio Barbon
View Abstract Download Free

Study of Electron Spin Lifetime of Conducting Carbon Nanomaterials

- Pp. 67-86 (20)
Balint Nafradi, Mohammad Choucair and Laszlo Forro
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

EPR Spectroscopy on Double-Walled and Multi- Walled Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites

- Pp. 87-106 (20)
Αngeliki Diamantopoulou, Spyridon Glenis, Grzegorz Zolnierkiewicz, Anna Szymczyk, Nikolaos Guskos and Vlassis Likodimos
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Impact of Point Defects on Graphene Oxide and Carbon Nanotubes: Study of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

- Pp. 107-129 (23)
Chuyen V. Pham, Sergej Repp, Michael Krueger and Emre Erdem
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Electron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy of Single- Walled Carbon-Nanotube Thin-Films and their Transistors

- Pp. 130-146 (17)
Kazuhiro Marumoto
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Characterizing the Nature of Surface Radicals in Carbon-Based Materials, Using Gas-Flow EPR Spectroscopy

- Pp. 147-168 (22)
Ortal Marciano and Sharon Ruthstein
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Application of the Two-Temperature EPR Measurement Method to Carbonaceous Solids

- Pp. 169-181 (13)
Andrzej B. Wieckowski and Grzegorz P. Słowik
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Paramagnetic Defects and Impurities in Nanodiamonds as Studied by Multi-frequency CW and Pulse EPR Methods

- Pp. 182-196 (15)
Victor Soltamov, George Mamin, Sergei Orlinskii and Pavel Baranov
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

EPR and FMR of SiCN Ceramics and SiCN Magnetic Derivatives

- Pp. 197-224 (28)
Sushil K. Misra and Sergey I. Andronenko
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

CW and Pulse EPR Study of Paramagnetic Centers in Silicon Carbide Nanomaterials

- Pp. 225-242 (18)
Dariya Savchenko, Andreas Poppl and Abdel Hadi Kassiba
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Size-dependent Effects in Silicon Carbide and Diamond Nanomaterials as Studied by CW and Pulse EPR Methods

- Pp. 242-253 (12)
Dariya Savchenko
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Paramagnetic Defects in Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Carbide and Silicon Carbonitride Films

- Pp. 254-282 (29)
Ekaterina Kalabukhova, Dariya Savchenko and Bela Shanina
View Abstract Purchase Chapter

Subject Index

- Pp. 283-288 (6)
Dariya Savchenko and Abdel Hadi Kassiba
Download Free

Foreword

Carbon based materials include nanographites, conducting carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes, graphene oxides, nanodiamonds, hybrids like carbon nanotubes embedded into polymer composites or functionalized molecular groups. These compounds are being implemented in multiple architectures with versatile chemical bonding, organization and morphologies leading to the unique physical properties such as exceptional electrical, thermal, structural dependent dimensionalities, mechanical and tribological performances. For instance, pure diamond is an excellent electrical insulator while some graphite based materials are more or less good electrical conductors, depending on their composition and pre-treatment. Carbon and graphite foams are very good thermal insulators, even at very high temperatures. On the other hand, diamond is used for the heat sink in electronics due to its very high thermal conductivity. Mechanical properties of carbon materials also differ considerably, depending on the type of the material. Since carbon allotropes and hybrids materials may contain different chemical bonding, multi-functional compounds can be tailored for various applications in nanoelectronics, integrated optoelectronics, energy storage and conversion, sensors, biomedicine, etc., being both already implemented in working devices and currently under development.

Intrinsic electronic features originating from doping or structural defects critically contribute to physical properties of carbon-based materials. These features may be exhaustively characterized by various electron magnetic resonance techniques including continuous wave (CW) or pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and other advanced electron magnetic resonance methods. Using a variety of complementary EPR techniques provides detailed insight into the local environment and the electronic peculiarity of defect structures in carbon-based systems. Moreover, extraordinary sensitivity of EPR techniques to the relaxation times (both spin-lattice and spin-spin) of paramagnetic species as well as the capability of selective control and detection of defects paves the way for the understanding of spin dynamics, which is extremely important in quantum computation or implementations of non-volatile memory devices. Thus, EPR techniques, based on different instrumental functionalities and methodologies, due to their specific window of time scales allow probing structural and electronic features of intrinsic and engineered spin systems in carbon based materials with the aim to open new challenges toward advanced and emerging technologies.

Dr. Alexander I. Shames
Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance,
Department of Physics
Faculty of Natural Sciences
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Be’er-Sheva
Israel


Preface

The Volume 1 of Frontiers in Magnetic Resonance comprises 13 chapters on topics of high importance in the field of electron paramagnetic resonance study of carbon-containing nanomaterials. The topics and authors were selected from recently published papers in highly cited journals (Nat. Commun., Sci. Rep., J. Mater. Chem. C, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., Phys. Rev. B, Appl. Phys. Lett., J. Appl. Phys., Chem. Phys. Lett., Phys. Status Solidi B, Appl. Magn. Reson., etc.).

The first chapter by Prof. S.K. Misra will give the reader the fundamentals of EPR spectroscopy in regards to its application to the carbon-containing materials. The focus of chapter 2 by Dr. A. Barbon et al. is set to the resolution of the EPR signals attributable to different species, or structures, that are present in graphite and graphene-like materials. Chapter 3 by Prof. L. Forró et al., presents the ESR characterization of spin dynamics of conducting carbon nanomaterials. In chapter 4, by Dr. V. Likodimos et al., the EPR spectroscopy is exploited to investigate spin dynamics of DWCNTs and composites of oxidized MWCNTs embedded in an elastomeric poly(ether-ester) block copolymer. Chapter 5 by Dr. rer. nat. E. Erdem et al., focuses on discussing EPR investigations on graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, and carbon nanotubes with different chemical functionalities. In Chapter 6, Dr. K. Marumoto reviews the ESR spectroscopy of semiconducting single-walled CNT thin films and their transistors. Chapter 7 by Dr. S. Ruthstein et al. describes the findings on the oxygenation processes of coal and graphene materials using in-situ EPR experiments at various atmospheric environments. In Chapter 8, Prof. A.B. Więckowski et al. describe the application of the two-temperature EPR measurement method to carbonaceous solids. In Chapter 9, Prof. P. Baranov et al. review the characterization of impurities in nanodiamonds by means of multifrequency CW and pulse EPR techniques. Chapter 10 by Dr.Sc. S. Andronenko et al. shows the application of multifrequency EPR to the study of SiCN nanoceramics. In Chapter 11, Prof. A. Kassiba et al. discuss the study of paramagnetic centers in SiC nanomaterials by means of CW and pulse EPR techniques. In Chapter 12, Dr. D. Savchenko reviews the size effects observed in EPR and ENDOR spectra of SiC nanoparticles and nanodiamonds. Finally, in Chapter 13, DrSc. E. Kalabukhova et al. review the EPR study of paramagnetic defects in amorphous a-Si1-xCx:H and a-SiCxNy thin films.

We would like to express our gratitude to all the authors for their excellent contributions. We would also like to thank the entire team of Bentham Science Publishers, particularly Mr. Shehzad Naqvi (Senior Manager Publication) and Dr. Faryal Sami (Assistant Manager Publications), for their excellent efforts. We are confident that this volume will receive wide appreciation from students and researchers.

Dr. Dariya Savchenko
Department of Analysis of Functional Materials,
Division of Optics, Institute of Physics CAS, Prague
Czech Republic
Department of Physics and Solid State Physics,
National Technical University of Ukraine
“Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Kyiv
Ukraine
Prof. Abdel Hadi Kassiba
Institute of Molecules and Materials, UMR-CNRS,
Le Mans University, Le Mans
France

List of Contributors

Author(s):
Dariya Savchenko


Abdel Hadi Kassiba




Contributor(s):
Abdel Hadi Kassiba
Institute of Molecules and Materials, UMR-CNRS
Le Mans University
72085 Le Mans
France


Andrzej B. Więckowski
Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy
University of Zielona Góra, Szafrana 4a
65-516 Zielona Góra
Poland
/
Institute of Molecular Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences
Smoluchowskiego 17
60-179 Poznań
Poland


Andreas Pöppl
Institute of Experimental Physics II, Faculty of Physics and Earth Sciences
Leipzig University
Leipzig, 04103
Germany


Αngeliki Diamantopoulou
Section of Solid State Physics, Department of Physics
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Panepistimiopolis, 15 784
Greece


Anna Szymczyk
Institute of Physics
West Pomeranian University of Technology, Al. Piastow 48
70-311 Szczecin
Poland


Antonio Barbon
Department of Chemical Sciences
University of Padova
Padova
Italy


Bálint Náfrádi
Laboratory of Physics of Complex Matter (LPMC), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
CH-1015 Lausanne
Switzerland


Chuyen V. Pham
Laboratory for MEMS Applications
Department of Microsystems Engineering - IMTEK, University of Freiburg, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103
D79110 Freiburg
Germany


Dariya Savchenko
Department of Analysis of Functional Materials, Division of Optics
Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences
Prague, 182 00
Czech Republic
/
Department of Physics and Solid State Physics
National Technical University of Ukraine “Igor Sikorsky Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”
Kyiv, 03056
Ukraine


Emre Erdem
Institute of Physical Chemistry
University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21
79104 Freiburg
Germany


Francesco Tampieri
Department of Chemical Sciences
, University of Padova
Padova
Italy


George Mamin
Department of Quantum electronics and radiospectroscopy
Kazan Federal University
Kazan, 420000
Russian Federation


Grzegorz P. Słowik
Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy
University of Zielona Góra, Szafrana 4a
65-516 Zielona Góra
Poland


Grzegorz Zolnierkiewicz
Institute of Physics
West Pomeranian University of Technology, Al. Piastow 48
70-311 Szczecin
Poland


Kazuhiro Marumoto
Division of Materials Science
University of Tsukuba
Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573
Japan
/
Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science (TIMS)
University of Tsukuba
Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571
Japan


Mohammad Choucair
School of Chemistry
University of Sydney
Sydney, New South Wales 2006
Australia


Michael Krueger
Carl-von-Ossietzky University Oldenburg
Institute of Physics, Carl-von- Ossietzky Str. 9-11
D-26129 Oldenburg
Germany


Nikolaos Guskos
Institute of Physics
West Pomeranian University of Technology, Al. Piastow 48
70-311 Szczecin
Poland


Ortal Marciano
Bar-Ilan University
Faculty of Exact Sciences, Department of Chemistry
5290002, Ramat Gan
Israel


Pavel Baranov
Microwave Spectroscopy of Crystals Laboratory
Ioffe Institute
RAS, St Petersburg, 194021
Russian Federation


Sergey I. Andronenko
Department of Physics
Concordia University
Montreal
Canada, H3G 1M8
/
Institute of Physics
Kazan Federal University
Kazan, 420008
Russian Federation


Sergej Repp
Institute of Physical Chemistry
University of Freiburg, Albertstr. 21
79104 Freiburg
Germany


Sergei Orlinskii
Department of Quantum electronics and radiospectroscopy
Kazan Federal University
Kazan, 420000
Russian Federation


Sharon Ruthstein
Bar-Ilan University
Faculty of Exact Sciences, Department of Chemistry
5290002, Ramat Gan
Israel


Spyridon Glenis
Section of Solid State Physics
Department of Physics, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Panepistimiopolis, 15 784
Greece


Sushil K. Misra
Department of Physics
Concordia University
Montreal, H3G 1M8
Canada


Vlassis Likodimos
Section of Solid State Physics, Department of Physics
National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
Panepistimiopolis, 15 784
Greece


Viktor Soltamov
Microwave Spectroscopy of Crystals Laboratory
Ioffe Institute
RAS, St Petersburg, 194021
Russian Federation
/
Department of Quantum electronics and radiospectroscopy
Kazan Federal University
Kazan, 420000
Russian Federation




Advertisement

International Conference On Drug Discovery & Therapy 2019


Webmaster Contact: info@benthamscience.org Copyright © 2018 Bentham Science